Day 2: Novena to St Joseph the Worker

Posted April 23, 2015 by Walt
Categories: Pope John Paul II, Prayers, St Joseph

While the Jubilee year turns our gaze to the mystery of the Incarnation, it invites us to reflect with particular intensity on the hidden life of Jesus in Nazareth. It was there that he spent most of his earthly life. With his silent diligence in Joseph’s workshop, Jesus gave the highest proof of the dignity of work. Today’s Gospel mentions how the residents of Nazareth, his fellow villagers, welcomed him with surprise, asking one another: “Where did this man get this wisdom and these mighty works? Is not this the carpenter’s son?” (Mt 13: 54-55).

The Son of God did not disdain being called a “carpenter” and did not want to be spared the normal condition of every human being. “The eloquence of the life of Christ is unequivocal: he belongs to the “working world’, he has appreciation and respect for human work. It can indeed be said that he looks with love upon human work and the different forms that it takes, seeing in each one of these forms a particular facet of man’s likeness with God, the Creator and Father” (Encyclical Laborem exercens, n. 26).

(from Pope John Paul II)

Novena Prayer to St Joseph the Worker

O glorious patriarch St Joseph, humble and just workman of Nazareth, who has given to all Christians but especially to us, the example of a perfect life of assiduous work and admirable union with Mary and Jesus, help us in our daily tasks, so that we Catholic workmen may also be able to find in them the efficacious means to glorify our Lord, to sanctify ourselves, and to be useful to the society in which we live – all as supreme ideals of our actions.

Obtain for us from our Lord, O beloved Protector, humility and simplicity of heart, love of work, and benevolence toward those who are our companions in it; conformity to the divine will in the inevitable sufferings of this life, and joy in bearing them; a consciousness of our specific social mission and a sense of our responsibility; a spirit of discipline and of prayer; docility and respect toward our superiors; brotherhood toward our equals; charity and indulgence for those who depend on us. Be with us in moments of success, when everything beckons us to taste the honest fruits of our fatigue; but sustain us in our hours of sadness, when heaven seems to be closed against us and the very instruments of labor seem to rebel in our hands.

We raise our hearts to you now, St Joseph, to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining for us from the divine Heart of Jesus these special graces and favors: (……)

Grant that according to your example we may keep our eyes fixed on our mother Mary, your most sweet spouse, who silently used to do her weaving in a corner of your modest workshop, with the sweetest smile playing on her lips. Grant that we may not lose sight of Jesus, who busied himself with you at your carpenter’s bench. Thus may we be able to lead a peaceful and holy life on earth, as a prelude to that eternally happy one which awaits us in heaven forever and ever. Amen.

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Day 1: Novena to St Joseph the Worker

Posted April 22, 2015 by Walt
Categories: Pope John Paul II, Prayers, St Joseph

Our labors – at home, in the fields, in industries and in offices – could turn into an exhausting busyness ultimately devoid of meaning (cf. Eccl 1: 3). Let us ask the Lord for it to be the fulfillment of his plan, so that our work may recover its original meaning.

And what is the original meaning of work? We have heard it in the first reading from the Book of Genesis. God gave man, created in his image and likeness, a command: “Fill the earth and subdue it” (Gn 1: 28). The Apostle Paul echoes these words when he writes to the Christians of Thessalonica: “When we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat”, and exhorts them “to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living” (2 Thes 3: 10, 12).

In God’s plan, work is therefore seen as a right and duty. Necessary to make the earth’s resources benefit the life of each person and of society, it helps to direct human activity towards God in the fulfillment of his command to “subdue the earth”. In this regard another of the Apostle’s exhortations echoes in our souls: “So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God” (1 Cor 10: 31).

(from Pope John Paul II)

Novena Prayer to St Joseph the Worker

O glorious patriarch St Joseph, humble and just workman of Nazareth, who has given to all Christians but especially to us, the example of a perfect life of assiduous work and admirable union with Mary and Jesus, help us in our daily tasks, so that we Catholic workmen may also be able to find in them the efficacious means to glorify our Lord, to sanctify ourselves, and to be useful to the society in which we live – all as supreme ideals of our actions.

Obtain for us from our Lord, O beloved Protector, humility and simplicity of heart, love of work, and benevolence toward those who are our companions in it; conformity to the divine will in the inevitable sufferings of this life, and joy in bearing them; a consciousness of our specific social mission and a sense of our responsibility; a spirit of discipline and of prayer; docility and respect toward our superiors; brotherhood toward our equals; charity and indulgence for those who depend on us. Be with us in moments of success, when everything beckons us to taste the honest fruits of our fatigue; but sustain us in our hours of sadness, when heaven seems to be closed against us and the very instruments of labor seem to rebel in our hands.

We raise our hearts to you now, St Joseph, to implore your powerful intercession in obtaining for us from the divine Heart of Jesus these special graces and favors: (……)

 

 Grant that according to your example we may keep our eyes fixed on our mother Mary, your most sweet spouse, who silently used to do her weaving in a corner of your modest workshop, with the sweetest smile playing on her lips. Grant that we may not lose sight of Jesus, who busied himself with you at your carpenter’s bench. Thus may we be able to lead a peaceful and holy life on earth, as a prelude to that eternally happy one which awaits us in heaven forever and ever. Amen.

Esto vir !!!

Posted March 10, 2015 by Walt
Categories: Announcements, Conferences, Men's issues

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Catholic men’s movement

Posted March 26, 2014 by Walt
Categories: Articles, Men's groups

Tim Drake offered his assessment of the Catholic men’s movement in this article yesterday on Catholic Pulse.

CTK Men’s Retreat

Posted February 7, 2014 by Walt
Categories: Audio talks, Other apostolates, Pope John Paul II, Retreats

The talks at the 2014 Men’s Retreat sponsored by Christ the King Parish in Ann Arbor were given by Dr Edward Sri.  His talks are available in their audio archive.  I haven’t yet listened to them, but will surely be doing so in the near future.  Here are the links:

Talk #1: Practical Insights from John Paul II — Part 1

Talk #2: Practical Insights from John Paul II — Part 2

Talk #3: Will I Be the Hero of My Life?  Virtue and the Mission

Talk #4: The Primacy of the Interior Life

Is this politically correct?

Posted January 10, 2014 by Walt
Categories: Books, Scripture

The Catholic Men’s Bible.  Read about it here.  It’s less expensive here.
I wonder if it contains feminist inclusive language?

Catholic Men's Bible

Reading material for young athletes

Posted December 26, 2013 by Walt
Categories: Articles, Books, Family, Role models, Sports

Fr James V. Schall SJ

Fr James V. Schall SJ

When the highly esteemed Jesuit scholar and commentator on modern culture, Fr James V. Schall SJ, writes a positive review of a book by a professional athlete, I sit up and pay attention.  Earlier this month, Fr Schall wrote such a review on The Catholic Thing website.  His subject was John Stockton, former point guard for the NBA’s Utah Jazz, an NBA hall-of-famer, and a Gonzaga alumnus.  John recounts his life for us in Assisted: An Autobiography, which was published two months ago.  You can read Fr Schall’s article here.
Assisted_John_Stockton